The disposable world of CRM

The disposable world of CRM

It has long been said that The United States of America is a throw-away society. For years, possibly decades, rather than fixing something, we toss it and purchase a replacement. You don’t believe me? Simply do a google search for TV Repair in your area. You could do the same for microwave repair, cell phone repair, etc.

Now don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying some people don’t seek to repair a broken item, and that no TV repair companies exist, I’m simply saying repairing versus replacing is happening less and less. I believe there are several reasons for this phenomenon: Continue reading →

The most common excuse for not using CRM

The most common excuse for not using CRM

Excuse for Not using CRMWhen we read quotes like, “It’s incredibly easy to get caught up in an activity trap, in the busy-ness of life… It is possible to be busy – very busy – without being very effective,” by Stephen Covey, we sometimes dismiss it as “that doesn’t happen here.” However, I have seen this over and over again with CRM implementations.

A company will implement a CRM system and mandate usage and the population of a lot of data by their sales force. This usually results in push-back. Salespeople will say things like “I’m too busy closing sales to worry about CRM,” or “I don’t have time to ‘feed the beast’ I’m knocking on doors.” You get the picture, and if you implemented CRM, you’ve probably heard it too. Continue reading →

Top 4 Things Executives do that Kill CRM

Top 4 Things Executives do that Kill CRM

In their haste to increase user adoption and achieve ROI from CRM, executives sometimes set-up roadblocks to their own success. That’s right, company executives can frequently be the speed bump hampering their CRM success.

Dead CRMHow can this be?  The issue to companies’ lack of success with a CRM implementation comes subtlety after implementing a CRM software.  For some reason, with the implementation of CRM software, companies shift the focus from results to CRM software utilization. Let me give you four examples: Continue reading →

The best delivery method for CRM

The best delivery method for CRM

It is fitting that I am writing this blog during the football season, because I enjoy playing fantasy football.  In fact, I enjoy it so much I am in three different leagues on two different fantasy football websites (NFL.com and ESPN.com).  While both websites have their good and bad points, they both have one thing in common:  multiple ways to access my team!  For both they have a full-blown website, a mobile version of the website, and an app for my Android phone and iPad. Continue reading →

A history of man rejecting technology.  One big lesson to learn.

A history of man rejecting technology. One big lesson to learn.

John Henry
retold by
S. E. Schlosser

Now John Henry was a mighty man, yes sir. He was born a slave in the 1840’s but was freed after the war. He went to work as a steel-driver for the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad, don’t ya know. And John Henry was the strongest, the most powerful man working the rails.

John Henry, he would spend his day’s drilling holes by hitting thick steel spikes into rocks with his faithful shaker crouching close to the hole, turning the drill after each mighty blow. There was no one who could match him, though many tried. Continue reading →

3 Crucial Business Trends to Plan for in 2014

3 Crucial Business Trends to Plan for in 2014

Business professors Gary Hamel and C.K. Prahalad have written about an experiment that was conducted with a group of monkeys.  It is a vivid story of failure.

Four monkeys were placed in a room that had a tall pole in the center.  Suspended from the top of that pole was a bunch of bananas.  One of the hungry monkeys started climbing the pole to get something to eat, but just as he reached out to grab a banana, he was doused with a torrent of cold water.  Squealing, he scampered down the pole and abandoned his attempt to feed himself.  Each monkey made a similar attempt, and each one was drenched with cold water.  After making several attempts, they finally gave up. Continue reading →

Utilization Frustrations With CRM … Why “Just Do It” Doesn’t Work

Utilization Frustrations With CRM … Why “Just Do It” Doesn’t Work

CRM ProfitIf you have a sales person who loves your CRM system, is excellent at updating deals, and is diligent at entering notes, I can bet one thing and win 99% of the time:  He or she is not your top sales person.  How am I so certain?  Most CRM systems are built with the end in mind (collecting data) on the means (enabling the sales person).

Let me be clear.  Enabling sales does not mean collecting data; enabling sales means providing data in the easiest method possible. Continue reading →

The Unintentional Killing of CRM

The Unintentional Killing of CRM

Over my last fifteen years of facilitating CRM implementations, there are two programs that have been the unintentional death of CRM within many organizations:

OUTLOOK

In their efforts to implement a corporate calendar, increase mobility of CRM data, or simply to placate user’s demands, many organizations implement some sort of integration between their CRM system and Microsoft Outlook for the synching of calendars and contacts.  Often, this integration is clunky (a technical term for bloated and difficult to use) and fraught with issues. Continue reading →

CRM, easy as riding a bike?

CRM, easy as riding a bike?

Let me ask you a simple question.  Would you say that using your CRM system is easier than riding a bike?  Is it easier than driving a car?  Most of the time when I ask this, the answer to both questions is no, CRM is definitely more difficult than riding a bike or driving a car.

No kidding, your CRM system is more difficult than riding a bike or driving a car?  So let me ask you this, which did you spend more time learning to do, ride a bike, drive a car, or use your CRM system? Continue reading →

Great Expectations for Outside Sales usage of CRM

Great Expectations for Outside Sales usage of CRM

Setting realistic goals is critical for a successful CRM implementation.  However, just as critical is having realistic expectations.  What’s the difference?  A goal is what you hope to achieve through the implementation of a CRM system, an expectation is the anticipation of an occurrence.  For example, a company may have the goal of increasing quote conversion by 5%.  The expectation is that the sales people will enter their quotes/opportunities into the CRM system and keep them up to date.

Over the last 15 years, I have had the privilege of consulting with 100s of companies as they set realistic goals and expectations for CRM.  The goal of the next few paragraphs is to help my readers understand what is realistic in the realm of user expectations of your outside sales representatives. Continue reading →