Don’t waste your money on CRM if …

Don’t waste your money on CRM if …

Over the last 18 years of CRM consulting and software implementations and integrations, I have come to learn several truths.  The most basic of these is the role software plays in a CRM implementation.  And over the last 14 of the 18 years I have been sharing this CRM implementation chart. The funny thing is that at least 95% of the executives I share this with agree that a CRM implementation is about so much more than technology. In fact, I believe it is roughly 10% technology, 30% process and 60% culture (or people).

With 95% of the executives I speak to agreeing that CRM is so much more encompassing than software, how many of them truly believe it? How many of them actually spend the time to analyze their processes and people in relation to CRM? How many of them actually make a plan for incorporating CRM into the Process and Culture of their organization?  Less than 5%! Continue reading →

Why I Believe You Need a CRM Strategy, and How to Create One

Why I Believe You Need a CRM Strategy, and How to Create One

In my earlier blog post, CRM Selection in 4 (Huge) Steps, I gave a brief overview of the four main steps to CRM selection. Since that post, I have been in several discussions as to whether the first step, defining your CRM strategy, is needed. I will attempt to highlight what a CRM strategy is and why you need it.

My biggest argument for developing a CRM strategy is the age-old adage, “if you don’t know what you’re aiming for, you will hit it every time.” I have said it may times, if your goal is to implement CRM, implementing CRM will be the accomplishment of that goal; however, your company may see little or no benefit from the action of implementing CRM.

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CRM Selection in 4 (Huge) Steps

CRM Selection in 4 (Huge) Steps

Implementing CRM is not the same as implementing an accounting package or an email system. An accounting system is used for tracking financial information for internal and legal reporting purposes. The number of users is generally limited to those who understand accounting practices, and generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) are the foundation for the implementation. Email on the other hand is a communication tool, and also adheres to standards. CRM, on the other hand, is the wild-wild west of implementations. While there are some standards in the CRM industry, most of a CRM strategy is custom to the company implementing CRM. This makes buying a CRM system a custom process.

The first thing I tell my customers is this, “don’t implement a CRM system, if you don’t have a plan and honest, straight-forward goals for CRM.” Why? It will be a huge waste of time and money, since CRM is so much more than an address book or a quote tracking tool.

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One Fatal Trend Preventing CRM Success

One Fatal Trend Preventing CRM Success

I have blogged in the past about business strategy, and C-level buy-in. I’ve been on my soap-box talking about reasonable expectations of sales people.  I’ve even been so bold as to say that many of your current CRM issues are not technical issues.  This blog is going to take a bit of a turn.

Over the course of the last 16 years of CRM consulting, I have noticed a trend, but have been unable to put my finger on just what the trend is. Whether it is because I am sometimes slow to grasp things, or because it is so easy I didn’t think it could be a “magic bullet,” I am uncertain.  However here is what I see to be one CRM system trend that is debilitating, if not fatal to CRM success.  What is this trend: OVER COMPLICATION! Continue reading →

CRM Implementation: Fool me once, shame on you …

CRM Implementation: Fool me once, shame on you …

In their first implementation of a CRM system, many companies implement software with the expectation that their people will use it and will naturally work it into their processes. Immediately after the implementation, they are elated; people used it! Success! Then the demands of their users’ everyday lives hit and CRM takes a back-burner to “getting work done.” After a couple of years of haphazard usage of CRM, nobody trusts the data, and the CRM system is deemed a failure. Continue reading →

The top 4 reasons why you should not implement CRM

The top 4 reasons why you should not implement CRM

1)If you are planning on devoting 90% of your time and budget to selecting and implementing CRM software, you probably shouldn’t be implementing CRM.

This point is nothing new.  You have heard it over and over again, CRM is a BUSINESS STRATEGY.  It’s about focusing on your customer by aligning your culture, process and technology.  In fact, if you have read any of my blogs, you will see that I believe CRM is only about 10% technology, the rest is culture and process.  So, if 90% of your implementation is NOT ABOUT TECHNOLOGY, for a successful CRM implementation, you need to spend considerably more time on process and culture.   Continue reading →

3 Foundational Truths to Pre-CRM Implementation Planning

3 Foundational Truths to Pre-CRM Implementation Planning

Your Internally-Devised Solution Will Look A Lot Like Your Existing Solution

I have found that the most successful CRM implementations happen when Resolv is involved early on.  This isn’t because we are mystical wizards, it’s because, as CRM facilitators, we understand what a CRM implementation will do to your sales force, your customers, and your processes.  We have first-hand experience, knowing what has worked in the past, and what hasn’t.  We can help you sidestep many mishaps that only come through years of experience.  We can guide you as to where to focus your money to achieve the greatest return on investment. Continue reading →

The 4 Es of CRM Success

The 4 Es of CRM Success

Whether you have a CRM system in place, or are looking to implement CRM, remember the 4 Es and you CRM success is almost assured.  Ignore them, and the only thing you will be getting from your CRM system is complaints and blame.

 1)      Enable

When you enable your users with CRM, you give them the means to accomplish their job.  It goes without saying that accomplishing this should be easier than without a CRM system.  If your CRM system is not an enablement tool for your users, it will be used only through coercion. Continue reading →

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