The disposable world of CRM

The disposable world of CRM

It has long been said that The United States of America is a throw-away society. For years, possibly decades, rather than fixing something, we toss it and purchase a replacement. You don’t believe me? Simply do a google search for TV Repair in your area. You could do the same for microwave repair, cell phone repair, etc.

Now don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying some people don’t seek to repair a broken item, and that no TV repair companies exist, I’m simply saying repairing versus replacing is happening less and less. I believe there are several reasons for this phenomenon: Continue reading →

You Might Not Understand CRM, If …

You Might Not Understand CRM, If …

Recently I was sitting in a cigar lounge enjoying a conversation with a professional-looking couple in town from San Diego.  They had come to Green Bay to attend the Packers/Chargers game. Through billowing puffs of smoke, the question came up, as it typically does, “what do you do?” I replied with my standard, fifteen second answer, “I facilitate the adoption and implementation of CRM systems.” “I’ve heard of CRM,” he blurted, “that’s an electronic account list.”

I was aghast. I thought this guy was a professional. Surely he didn’t just say that CRM is an “electronic account list.” This man, a professional, or so I thought, turned out to be a CRM redneck. I was certain the next words out of his mouth were going to be “yuuuup,” and “get’r done.” All I thought about the rest of the evening was Jeff Foxworthy type jokes, except that instead of, “you might be a redneck,” jokes, they were “you might not understand CRM,” jokes.

Continue reading →

The most common excuse for not using CRM

The most common excuse for not using CRM

Excuse for Not using CRMWhen we read quotes like, “It’s incredibly easy to get caught up in an activity trap, in the busy-ness of life… It is possible to be busy – very busy – without being very effective,” by Stephen Covey, we sometimes dismiss it as “that doesn’t happen here.” However, I have seen this over and over again with CRM implementations.

A company will implement a CRM system and mandate usage and the population of a lot of data by their sales force. This usually results in push-back. Salespeople will say things like “I’m too busy closing sales to worry about CRM,” or “I don’t have time to ‘feed the beast’ I’m knocking on doors.” You get the picture, and if you implemented CRM, you’ve probably heard it too. Continue reading →

CRM Implementation: Fool me once, shame on you …

CRM Implementation: Fool me once, shame on you …

In their first implementation of a CRM system, many companies implement software with the expectation that their people will use it and will naturally work it into their processes. Immediately after the implementation, they are elated; people used it! Success! Then the demands of their users’ everyday lives hit and CRM takes a back-burner to “getting work done.” After a couple of years of haphazard usage of CRM, nobody trusts the data, and the CRM system is deemed a failure. Continue reading →

The top 4 reasons why you should not implement CRM

The top 4 reasons why you should not implement CRM

1)If you are planning on devoting 90% of your time and budget to selecting and implementing CRM software, you probably shouldn’t be implementing CRM.

This point is nothing new.  You have heard it over and over again, CRM is a BUSINESS STRATEGY.  It’s about focusing on your customer by aligning your culture, process and technology.  In fact, if you have read any of my blogs, you will see that I believe CRM is only about 10% technology, the rest is culture and process.  So, if 90% of your implementation is NOT ABOUT TECHNOLOGY, for a successful CRM implementation, you need to spend considerably more time on process and culture.   Continue reading →

3 Foundational Truths to Pre-CRM Implementation Planning

3 Foundational Truths to Pre-CRM Implementation Planning

Your Internally-Devised Solution Will Look A Lot Like Your Existing Solution

I have found that the most successful CRM implementations happen when Resolv is involved early on.  This isn’t because we are mystical wizards, it’s because, as CRM facilitators, we understand what a CRM implementation will do to your sales force, your customers, and your processes.  We have first-hand experience, knowing what has worked in the past, and what hasn’t.  We can help you sidestep many mishaps that only come through years of experience.  We can guide you as to where to focus your money to achieve the greatest return on investment. Continue reading →

The 4 Es of CRM Success

The 4 Es of CRM Success

Whether you have a CRM system in place, or are looking to implement CRM, remember the 4 Es and you CRM success is almost assured.  Ignore them, and the only thing you will be getting from your CRM system is complaints and blame.

 1)      Enable

When you enable your users with CRM, you give them the means to accomplish their job.  It goes without saying that accomplishing this should be easier than without a CRM system.  If your CRM system is not an enablement tool for your users, it will be used only through coercion. Continue reading →

Utilization Frustrations With CRM … Why “Just Do It” Doesn’t Work

Utilization Frustrations With CRM … Why “Just Do It” Doesn’t Work

CRM ProfitIf you have a sales person who loves your CRM system, is excellent at updating deals, and is diligent at entering notes, I can bet one thing and win 99% of the time:  He or she is not your top sales person.  How am I so certain?  Most CRM systems are built with the end in mind (collecting data) on the means (enabling the sales person).

Let me be clear.  Enabling sales does not mean collecting data; enabling sales means providing data in the easiest method possible. Continue reading →

Who Is The Consumer In A CRM Implementation?

My background is working for large manufacturing companies who produce Consumer Goods.  In that industry we call the end user “the consumer”.  By definition a consumer is one who “uses up” something or is “engrossed” or “devours”.  Devour.  I like that word.  It’s a passionate word.  In the CRM industry, we want nothing more than for the users to devour the product we provide.  We want them to “use it up” everyday and come back the next day insisting to use it again.


In the CRM sales process, we typically work with senior management.  As it should be.  The purchase decision for a process and culture changing solution for a company should always come from the top.  But who really, is the consumer for this tool?  Who will devour it?  Who will insist that it be there for future consumption?  Depending on the organization, the answer to that question will vary.  Sometimes the CEO of the company is masterful at using CRM.   More often however, it’s those who have direct responsibility for the customer.  It’s the sales team, it’s customer service reps, it’s marketing managers that are the CRM consumers.


In the consumer goods industry we would spend countless hours (and dollars) researching, developing and producing products that the end user, the consumer, would devour.  We would allocate tremendous resources to consumer focus groups, graphic design, and marketing tag line development to create demand by the consumer.  It’s not always about filling an existing need (a demand), but bringing awareness to the consumer they have a need (creating a demand).


If you have made the determination you are going to implement CRM software at your organization, who is your consumer?  I mentioned earlier that the purchase decision for CRM typically comes from the top.  That means a board, or a senior management committee in most cases. As a member of that board or chosen team, have you given any consideration to how you will create demand for the product you are introducing to the consumer (your employees)?


CRM is a tool that can truly revolutionize the way you go to business.  It can propel you to a level of efficiency and ultimately success you have not been able to achieve in the past.  Without it, your competition (who does have CRM) will capture your market share. These are compelling facts that are a very solid foundation for a consumer marketing message.


Implementing, or maximizing the use of your existing CRM, is one of the most important strategic decisions your company will make.  It’s at least as important as the launch of another new product, if not more so.  Shouldn’t you create an internal marketing campaign for the consumers of  your CRM?  Just like with the launch of a new product, it could mean the difference between success and failure.

CRM For Best and Next Practices

I attended a leadership seminar in the CRM software industry where the expert speaker made the comment, “If you just copy you will always be behind. The only way to get ahead is to focus on not best practices, but next practices.” 


I believe it is human nature to emulate a best practice.  It is also natural (and often expected) for a company to emulate the practices of industry leaders.  After all, they must be doing something right.  So, is there anything wrong with emulating best practices?  I don’t think wrong is the right word.  It’s not wrong to adopt and implement excellent ideas.  It’s not wrong to be effective and efficient.  The larger the company the more important that is.  Waste of time and materials can become exponential very quickly and very painfully.  Evaluation of existing processes and measuring them against a predetermined criteria (the “best practice” measurements) isn’t ever a bad idea.  I think the lesson of the statement mentioned above is that when you become complacent in best practices and stop reaching for continuous improvement you are likely going to plateau.  Where you really want to be is where there is no one better to measure yourself against, right?


Because I live and breathe CRM solutions when I heard this statement, wrote it down, and re-read it several times I realized it was speaking to me on two levels.  One was mind set (the “best” and “next” parts of the sentence and the strategic planning they were referring to), and the other was execution (the reference to “practices”).  It’s really about getting the innovative and creative objectives we have OUT of our heads and into our daily lives where we can execute them.  There is the challenge.  Most of us are either highly capable of one or the other, but rarely both.  We are big planners and thinkers with little desire to perform the daily tasks to bring those big ideas to fruition or we are daily doers who love the tasks and hate it when someone comes along with yet another big idea that will mess up our day to day flow.  What is the answer? How do we get from best practices to next practices? How do we prioritize, organize, and execute on the big ideas without derailing the entire organization?

CRM software is how you do it. Not only can CRM software be used for existing process and culture alignment, but it can also be the tool that captures the big ideas and systematically makes them part of the existing workflow.  It can be used to measure how much time and resources are being used on a given project and allow those strategic thinkers to make educated decisions about what direction to provide next.  The brilliant idea of last month may not be holding water to the brilliant idea of this month that is expected to cost less to produce, get to market faster, and sell more.  Putting the project details in a single location so you can make educated decisions is one of the primary reasons for CRM.  CRM was designed to enhance the customer experience received from your organization.  That includes making the right decisions internally to improve your corporate and branding image to the outside world.  When there is a disconnect within your organization, there is likely a tool to aid you closing that gap.


CRM software is a tool that can not only take you to a place of emulated best practices but to a place of continuous improvement, and provide a platform for industry next practices.

Contact Kym Riedel at Resolv to learn female cialis more about what a CRM Business Strategy and what a software solution could mean for your company.  Kym can be reached at kriedel@resolvcrm.com or at 920-268-4074. Visit  www.resolvcrm.com  to read other educational articles specific to CRM solutions.

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